Wednesday, 18 April 2018

Equinox Tv's Anchorlady Mimi Mefo In South Africa For A Seminar And Historic Tour To Museums Harbouring The South African Story- Photos

Equinox Television's senior TV news presenter and reporter  Mimi Mefo is currently in South Africa, attending a seminar on the 'Management of Natural Resources in Africa:The Role of the Media".

The seminar started on Monday April 16, 2017, and will be ending next week Wednesday April 25th, 2018.
After today's schedule, Mimi visited some historic sites in the South African town of  Soweto, that holds part of the story of the great Legend Madiba in the days of apartheid.

She visited the Nelson Mandela National Museum, commonly referred to as 'Mandela House', situated at Vilakazi Street, Orlando West Soweto. 
This is the house where the late Madiba lived from 1946 to 1962, when he was arrested and sent to prison.

Mandela came back to the house after his release from prison in 1990, despite suggestions from government officials that he finds a safer home. 

At a rally welcoming him home to Soweto his opening words were, "I have come home at last."
However, after 11 days back at the house he moved out again.
He later wrote in his autobiography:
"That night I returned with Winnie to No. 8115 in Orlando West. It was only then that I knew in my heart I had left prison. For me No. 8115 was the centre point of my world, the place marked with an X in my mental geography"
The house is now basically a museum tribute, including quotes from Nelson himself plus his children, drawing visitors from all works of life.
Mimi equally visited the Hector Peterson Museum located in Orlando WestSoweto. 

Hector Peterson (19 August 1963 – 16 June 1976became the subject of an iconic image of the 1976 Soweto uprising in South Africa, when a news photograph by Sam Nzima of the dying Hector being carried by another Soweto resident while his sister ran next to them, was published around the world. 

He was killed at the age of 13 when the police opened fire on protesting students. For years, 16 June stood as a symbol of resistance to the brutality of the apartheid government. Today, it is designated Youth Day, when South Africans honour young people and bring attention to their needs.

The museum is named in his honour. 

It became one of the first museums in Soweto when it opened on 16 June 2002. 
A companion museum nearby is Mandela House, the former home of Nelson Mandela and his family, which has been run as a museum since 1997.
Mimi intends bringing home a wealth of knowledge from South Africa, not only from the Seminar, but also from the personal touch and see views of sites that tells the South African story and its heroes of the past and present.

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