The Drama As Unfolded During Yesterday's Hearing of Consortium Leaders At The Kangaroo Court - Video

The three Anglophone Consortium leaders who are being held captive in the junkyard of LRC appeared yesterday in the Kangaroo Court...



The three Anglophone Consortium leaders who are being held captive in the junkyard of LRC appeared yesterday in the Kangaroo Court of Quartier Generale, where Press men and women were denied access, for fear that their game plan will be foiled by the truth.
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As early as 7 a.m, the courtroom was already jam-packed with more than a hundred lawyers of both the Common and Civil Law including former and present Bar Presidents of both the English and French origin. 

The session opened at 10.50 a.m, at the declaration of the presiding judge. 

After inviting the accused persons were called to the stand, the judge asked if the State Counsel had any special observations, and he simply introduced the team with which he was working. 

The suspects Bibixy, Fontem and Balla who were already in the box all pleaded 'Not Guilty'

Then Barrister Akere Muna for Bar President and Lead Lawyer for the Defense Counsel gave his opening word, recalling that some 25 years ago he was in that same court with some other colleagues to defend another lawyer Yondo Black who was involved in a political case that had to do with multipartism. He also said federalism and multipartism were similar, given that we also have freedom of speech in Cameroon, it is unheard of that people face a trial for exercising that rights as citizens. 
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Barrister Akere Muna and some international lawyers at the court premise

The judge then requested that the interpreter be brought forward and take the oath, which was done. 

The charges were being read in French, but Barrister Muna opposed it, as everyone wanted to hear it in English. 

The judge asked the interpreter to translate, opening the most interesting parts of the hearing, as the translator at the start proved his incompetency in the much talked about bilingualism, that should be a prerequisite for someone, handling a case of such magnitude.

He kept pronouncing words wrongly, with implicating mistakes, when Bar President Sama, who like other lawyers present could no longer take the crooked sounding English in their ears spoke up. 

He revolted against the quality of translation and asked the translator to be professional. 

Every one agreed that he was not good enough, which prompted the judge to request tor an adjournment so that a professional translator could be gotten.

Bar President Tchoungang objected the judge and insisted that the hearing could go on while the search of a better translator is ongoing, which the Consortium guys all agreed to that.

Speaking up, the State Counsel outlined two things. He declared that when he received the accused persons in his office, they were all 'perfectly bilingual', which caused a stir of murmuring in the hall and one could hear people loudly say things like: 'I might be perfectly bilingual but I have the right to be judged in the language am most comfortable in

Secondly, the State Counsel proposed that one of his collaborators could translate, but the presiding judge objected saying because of time constraint, she won't have to allow another person take the oath and insisted that they carry on with the present incompetent translator. 

The Lead Counsel Barrister Akere Muna then introduced his colleagues who had been selected to plead the case, because over a hundred lawyers constituted could not talk. So ten strong-worded lawyers were selected. 

Not all  ten lawyers took turns to talk, but three including Bar President Eta Besong who in his first few lines asked the president and her members of jury if they were 'ready to render justice' or they were going to 'follow orders from above'. 

Bar President Tchoungang took  the scene, stressing out that this case is very symbolic and historic because it's like history repeating itself, that concerns the two key anglophone towns of Buea and Bamenda. The former being the place of celebration of the 50th anniversary of Cameroon and the latter being the birth place of multipartism in Cameroon. 

The defense counsel for the accused persons also raised the fact that their clients were judged out of their natural environment, which was making their case difficult. 

The State Counsel took his turn and said the military tribunal in Yaounde has a national competence, because some of their supposed crimes involved attack on state security and terrorism. 

The president then gave room for the prosecution to present their witnesses, and the State Counsel presented a list of supposed witnesses and civil claimants and said he was still investigating to see if there were any more. 

Meanwhile Article 370 and 414 of the Criminal Procedure Code states that "When a case is opened and debate starts, you cannot introduce more witnesses".

The big question on every lip is 'how on earth did the case go to court if there were no witnesses and civil claimants, who were supposed to have been taken care of during preliminary investigation?'.

At the request of the State Counsel, the case was adjourned to March 23rd 2017, where the Prosecuting Counsel is said to produce witnesses, which we all know will never happen, other wise, we shall be having Governor Okalia Bilia, Mayor Ekema Patrick, Former PM Peter Mafany Musonge and a host of others taking the stand as witnesses against their own people.

We can't wait to see those physical witnesses of  anglophone roots who will bold up in broad day light.

Meanwhile Barrister Nkongho Felix Balla AgborDr. Fontem A. Neba and Mancho Bibixy, all wore brave and courageous faces, sign of a very high winning spirit.

Watch the lone media present during the hearing report about the case.

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